Author Archives: Gail Bean Admin

The Tips and Tricks Of Accuquilt


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Accuquilt is a great way to cut shapes out to piece your quilt.  It saves time and creates perfect shapes for perfect piecing.  No more ruler and rotary cutter needed.  In addition to this, there are some real neat short cuts and tricks you can use with your Accuquilt to create great blocks and even binding.  You can use the Accuquilt to create beautiful quilts from those old quilt patterns  Watch this video below from Eleanor Burns as she demonstrates how in the way that she can only do. Click Here for more information on all our Accuquilt products or to order your own.

Breezy Buntings Throw Quilt Tutorial


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With the fall upon us the windy storm season is coming. For those who live in The BC South Coast, you have already experienced a storm last week that shut down a lot of greater Vancouver.  Some people were without power for three days.  Well that is the perfect time to snuggle up with a warm quilt and this Breezy Bunting quilt by Sarah Zimmerman is perfect for the upcoming fall season.  The quilt finishes at 68 inches square.  You will have fun making the quilt by following this tutorial.  Start by selecting your charm packs by Clicking Here.  Then see the huge selection of co-ordinating  fabric we have  from our website at hamelsfabrics.

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2 Charm Packs: Persimmon by Basic Grey

4 yd background: “Roasted Marshmallows Grunge”

4 1/2 yd backing:  2 yd GingerSnap (Golden Delicious Tart 30385 14), 2 yd Harvest Cider (Golden Delicious Tart 30382 15), 1/2 yd GingerSnap (Blueberry Crumbles 30385 12)

1/2 yd binding: Pumpkin spice (Golden Delicious Tart 30384 17)

Batting: at least 69″ x 69″

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Overview:

There are 4 different pieced units for this quilt, each utilizing HSTs (Half Square Triangles) and squares:

Pinwheels (13), Bunting A (22), Bunting B (12), and Corners (4)

Also, forming the background, there are:  16  squares, 20 setting triangles, and 4 corner triangles.

summary of parts

Cutting Instructions:

From background fabric (roasted marshmallow!):

For the pieced units,

1.   Cut 8  5″ x WOF strips.  Cut each strip into 5″ squares. Mark these on the wrong side, diagonally from corner to corner. Total:  64 5″ squares (58 for the top, 6 for the back)

2.  Cut 8  4 1/2″ x WOF strips, 1  4 1/2″ x 18″ strip.  Cut each strip into 4 1/2″ squares.  Total:  76 4 1/2″ squares (64 for the top, 12 for the back)

For the setting units,

3.  Cut 16  8 1/2″ squares:  3   8 1/2″ x WOF strips, 5 squares per strip, plus 1 square, from step 4)

4.  Cut 10  8 7/8″ squares :  3  8 7/8″ x WOF  strips, 4 squares per 2 strips, out of 3rd strip cut 2  8 7/8″ squares, and the odd 8 1/2″ square from step 3.  Cut these (8 7/8″ squares) on the diagonal, for the setting triangles.

setting triangles

5.  Cut 1  9 1/4″ square. Cut on both diagonals, for a total of 4 corner triangles.

corner triangles

From Binding fabric (Pumpkin Spice!):

Cut 7  2 1/2″ strips.  Sew end to end and press in half the entire length.  I roll mine around a bottle, ready and waiting for that fun final step!

Piecing Instructions:

Make HSTs:

Choose 64 charms from the 2 charm packs.  Pair with the 64 marked 5″ background squares.  Chain-piecing, sew 1/4″ from each side of the marked diagonal line, press, cut on the line and trim to 4 1/2″, press again.

trimmed hsts

Assemble Pieced Units:

Before you sew the units, play with placement and loosely determine a balance of color and saturation for the pinwheels, which make up the center of the quilt, and the buntings, which make up the border, being mindful of the 4 pinwheels in each corner.

Make 13 Pinwheel units:

apinwheel

 

Make 22 Bunting A units: 16 for the top, set aside 6 for the back

bunting A

 

Make 12 Bunting B units

bunting B

 

Make 4 Corner units

corner

 

Quilt Top Assembly Instructions:

Before assembling rows, choose 4 Pinwheel units for the corners, and sew the 4 corner set triangles to them.

Now is the time to determine your layout.  It helps to have your units in labeled stacks, so that you don’t get your Bunting A units confused with your Bunting B units.

The Layout:

cRows

Here is a diagram showing the layout, with the units color-coded:

diagram by color

Pinwheels=orange, Bunting A=light blue, Bunting B=brown, Corners=dark blue

Written out, and referring to the photo and the diagram, the rows are assembled like this:

Row 1:  Setting triangle, Pinwheel w/corner triangle, Setting triangle

Row 2:  Setting triangle, Bunting A, Corner unit, Bunting A, Setting triangle

Row 3:  Setting triangle, Bunting A, Bunting B, 8 1/2″ Square, Bunting B, Bunting A, Setting triangle

Row 4:  Setting triangle,Bunting A, Bunting B, 8 1/2″ Square, Pinwheel, 8 1/2″ Square, Bunting B, Bunting A, Setting triangle

Row 5:  Setting triangle, Bunting A, Bunting B, 8 1/2″ Square, Pinwheel, 8 1/2″ Square,Pinwheel, 8 1/2″ Square,Bunting B, Bunting A, Setting           triangle

Row 6 (longest row):  Pinwheel w/corner triangle, Corner unit, 8 1/2″ Square, Pinwheel, 8 1/2″ Square, Pinwheel, 8 1/2″ Square, Pinwheel, 8 1/2″ Square, Corner unit, Pinwheel w/corner triangle 

Row 7:  Setting triangle, Bunting A, Bunting B, 8 1/2″ Square, Pinwheel, 8 1/2″ Square, Pinwheel, 8 1/2 Square, Bunting B, Bunting A, Setting triangle

Row 8:  Setting triangle, Bunting A, Bunting B, 8 1/2″ Square, Pinwheel, 8 1/2″ Square, Bunting B, Bunting A, Setting triangle

Row 9:  Setting triangle, Bunting A, Bunting B, 8 1/2″ Square, Bunting B, Bunting A, Setting triangle

Row 10: Setting triangle, Bunting A, Corner unit, Bunting A, Setting triangle

Row 11:  Setting triangle, Pinwheel w/corner triangle, Setting triangle

Whew!  Are you still with me? Trust me when I tell you it is easier done than said!

Once you have assembled the rows, you may press them so the seams are opposing for each row, and sew the rows together, and Voila! finished top!

But that is not all, hang with me now, because we have a fun pieced backing to whip up, too! (The Nut Brown side of the quilt!)

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From the 1/2 yd of Ginger Snap, blueberry crumbles:

Cut 5  8 7/8″ squares. Cut on the diagonal, for a total of 10 setting triangles.

Cut 1  9 1/4″ square. Cut on both diagonals, for a total of 4 corner triangles.

Using the 6 Bunting A units set aside earlier:

back assembly

 

Sew the 6 units together, sewing the last two corner triangles to each end.  Press.

back assembly 2

 

Taking the remaining 2 pieces of backing fabrics, Harvest Cider and Ginger Snap, lay out the pieced strip between the two in a proportion that pleases you, and sew those last two seams!

Tip:  When I have a length of unpieced fabric to sew to a pieced length, I always pin to avoid puckers or gathers.

You will need batting at least 69″ x 69″.  Take care to line up the strip on the back with the front and baste…a little fiddley, but not too difficult.

baste

Quilt as you like, bind ‘er up and you have a wonderful, warm Fall throw, just in time for those cool nights and snuggles by fire!

Hot cider anyone?   

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One 68″ x 68″ quilted throw!

 

 

 

Tuesday’s Tip With Terry…. Is Your Quilt Growing A Beard?


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Bearding occurs when batting migrates through the fabric and onto the surface of a quilt, leaving a fuzzy white coating that resembles a soft beard.  Synthetic fibres are more likely to beard than cotton or wool, so if you use synthetic batting, choose one that has been bonded, a process that helps keep a batting fibres intact.  The best battings are of course cotton, wool or bamboo.  Avoid using loosely woven fabrics in your quilt.  High-quality, tightly woven fabric makes it harder for batting fibres to migrate.  To remove bearding, rub a damp washcloth across the surface of the quilt or use a fabric shaver.  Click Here for more info on our fabric shaver.

 

The Civil War Soldier Cot Quilt Pattern


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Civil war quilts are very popular to make.  With so many choices of reproduction fabrics, they are like taking a journey back in time.  Judy Anne Brenemen of Patterns From History has a great website offering free patterns and historical content of quilting, such as this Civil War Soldier Cot Quilt.  Be sure to check out her website at www.patternsfromhistory.com to see her vast collection.  Below is an expert sited below which talks about Civil War Soldiers Cot Quilts.  You can find this pattern on Judy Anne Brenemen’s website along with many other Civil War Patters.  Click Here to see our selection of Civil War Reproduction Fabrics.

“Sheets and Quilts are now very much wanted. The latter should be seven feet
long, four and a half feet wide and may be made of old calico or delaine,
with cotton quilted firmly between, so that it will not lose its place on
being washed.”

Soldiers’ Aid Society in Northern Ohio, 1863

* p87 “Quilts for Union Soldiers in the Civil War” by Virginia Gunn,
Quiltmaking in America: Beyond the Myths