Thrifty Thursday….Eye of the Storm


Eye of the Storm 2

*Today’s Thrifty Thursday item is the Eye of the Storm Quilt Kit. The finished quilt measures approximately 80″ x 80″ and features the collection Sweet Pea designed by Kansas Troubles Quilters for Moda. This quilt kit uses a Kansas Trouble’s layered patchwork technique and comes with pattern and all fabrics for the quilt top and binding.  Our regular price is $169.98 Our Thrifty Thursday price is only $84.99. Click Here to order yours today!  SOLD OUT!

*Thrifty Thursday items are final sale and may not be returned or refunded.

Eye of the Storm

Ironing and Pressing Patchwork


An iron can be your best tool whilst sewing your quilt blocks. The difference between a quilter whose work looks fabulous and one whose work is so-so often comes down to the ironing and pressing during the quilt’s construction. Your iron can smooth out problem corners, make your quilt lie flat, ease in a piece that’s just a shade too small, create crisp points and so much more. It’s very important to take some time with your iron to press your blocks and quilt tops properly. If you are considering a new iron, the Oliso iron is really neat in that it lifts itself automatically with just a touch.

Oliso-Pro-Smart-Iron-TG1600

We are also loving the new Steamfast travel steam iron. Currently these little hand-held pressing irons are very popular for quilters. They are easy to grasp with your hand and are great for maneuvering over your fabrics as you piece blocks together. They are portable, great to take to classes and retreats as well as to use right in your home studio. Our customers, who have recently purchased this iron, are raving about how much they love this small iron that gives some mighty good results!

SF-717-A_z

There is “ironing” and then there’s “pressing”. Ironing is the act of moving the iron back and forth overt the fabric. Pressing is a simple up and down movement of the iron. Quilters “press” with their irons in a simple up and down movement to avoid overstretching the seams. Just make sure you are using enough pressure to enable the heat to “set” the fabric.

Pressing1

We like using Best Press for this part of the quilt-making process. This spray produces flat, crisp quilt blocks and quilt tops that are nice and flat for laying over your batting and backing.BestPressSpray

There’s some debate in quilting regarding the use of steam. I, personally, like to use steam with my iron as I press quilt blocks. Hot water offers an added force to the iron’s heat to set seams. The use of steam will smooth out most creases and wrinkles from your fabrics. However, if you are working with paper patterns for paper foundation piecing, cut off the steam.

Use a cotton (high) setting on your iron when quilting with cotton fabrics. Remember that Fireside, Minky or other synthetic fabrics, need to be kept away from hot irons to avoid melting!

Fusible products also need to be ironed with caution. A fusible is a glue or glue-like bonding agent applied to interfacings and other materials that when melted with an iron, bond with fabric. Fusible are used to stabilize fabrics, to join fabrics together (as in fusible appliqué) and for other purposes. Each fusible product has a special personality and you must follow the directions that come on the package. Some fusible will quickly melt and destroy your iron with “goo” if you don’t use a pressing sheet. Others might require steam. Some won’t work with steam. The appliqué pressing sheet is great because you can see through this translucent product and keep an eye on your pressing.BTD206_z

We hope you can enjoy the ironing and pressing process as you create your quilt tops and let us know if we can help you with your pressing questions!

Thrifty Thursday….Rufus in the Garden


RufusintheGarden_z

Today’s *Thrifty Thursday item is our Rufus in the Garden Quilt Kit. This quilt measures 46″ x 58″ and features a mix of fabric collections.  The kit includes fabric for the quilt top and binding and the pattern Rufus in the Garden by Jan Patek. Our regular price is $129.00. Today’s Thrifty Thursday price is only $64.50. Click Rufus in the Garden to orders yours today!

*Thrifty Thursday items are final sale and may not be returned or refunded.

Thrifty Thursday….White Christmas Pillow


White Christmas Pillow

Today’s *Thrifty Thursday item is our White Christmas Pillow Kit. This finished pillow cover measures 12 1/2″ x 18″ and features beautiful hand embroidery, beading and ruffled edge details. The kit includes Fabrics for the pillow cover, rick rack, embroidery floss, tulle, button, beads, pigma pen and the pattern White Christmas Pillow by Crabapple Hill Studio. Our regular price is $52.00. Today’s Thrifty Thursday price is only $26.00. Click White Christmas Pillow to orders yours today!

*Thrifty Thursday items are final sale and may not be returned or refunded.

Tuesday Tip….What is a Walking Foot and How is it Used?


The Walking foot, (also referred to as an Even Feed, or Duel Feed Foot) is a presser foot that helps prevent multiple layers of fabric slipping when they are sewn together. As we prepare to get into 2018 quilting projects, perhaps you would like to finish some quilts by machine quilting them yourself.  In our Basic Machine Quilting class, students learn about using a “walking foot”. If you are unable to take our class, there are plenty of tutorials and videos online to assist you in machine quilting.

We stock a common “generic” low-shank walking foot at the store and if your machine manual says “low shank” we can often fit this generic foot to your machine. However, if you have a special machine or a high shank requirement, we might have to refer you to a sewing machine dealer to find the correct walking foot to attach to your machine. Please feel free to call us or come into the store to see if we can assist you with a walking foot.

Walking_Foot_Pic_2_Medium

The walking foot works by having it’s own set of feed dogs. As your machine needle moves up & down, a lever which clips to the needle bar lets the walking foot’s feed dogs move/walk along the fabric, hence the name walking foot. The fabric is therefore evenly fed through your machine.

The walking foot can be used for any project where fabrics are likely to slip, and is most commonly used for:

  • Lighter weight knit fabrics, to prevent stretching
  • Perfect pattern matching e.g. on plaid fabrics
  • Quilting where it helps to ensure that the layers of a quilt do not shift when they are quilted together.


Using the Walking foot for quilting

The most commonly used methods for quilting with a walking foot are;

1.  “In the Ditch” in the seam

stitch in ditch

2.    Grid lines

grid walking foot

3.    Echo quilting around your blocks, as done around the friendship star block below;

echo walking foot
The walking foot also often has a guide bar to help you to keep an even distance between quilt lines.

 

There are lots of creative ways you can use your walking foot for quilting using your machine’s practical and decorative stitches.  For example;

Running Stitch / Serpentine Stitch

Walking_Foot_Pic_7_Medium

 

With a walking foot and your quilt sandwich (three layers assembled: top, batting and backing) you can complete most quilts. This will save you a tremendous amount by not having to pay a professional to quilt your projects for you. Many antique quilts were originally quilted by hand following straight lines marked across a quilt top. You can re-create this traditional method yourself with a walking foot and some patience. If you look at how the modern quilters are quilting their quilt tops, they mostly do straight line quilting. So give your walking foot some exercise and try machine quilting your next project yourself by sewing in the ditch or quilting diagonal lines across your quilt.

straight line quilting